CHARLES PARK
www.charles-park.com
info@charles-park.com

Charles Park’s work focuses on the ephemeral materials within natural environments. He experiments with and blurs the lines between artificial and natural ideas, exposing their nuances. Charles has shifted to formulate an artistic language that delivers the decaying state of the modernising world. Park is currently pursuing an MFA degree in Photography at Parsons the New School. His work has been exhibited both in New York City and internationally, including most recently at the Pingyao International Photography Festival, China.

PAPER TRAIL (2017)
My work focuses on the ephemerality of artificial materials within natural environments. My concerns are related to the reintroduction of man-made products back into their potential sources, while also taking elements from the natural land. I explore areas and introduce objects, such as toilet paper into the environment to shape an ephemeral sculpture and document its transition into natural elements. 

 

CHEMIGRAMS (2016)
The chemigrams were created to subvert the traditional notion of Dental X-ray film. These chemigrams have been used to create images that focus on repetition and symmetry. By creating visual abstraction on X-ray film I negate the intended functionality. By superimposing multiple X-ray film over one another this will obscure the viewpoint and push the viewer to see the piece as a whole rather than scattered fragments.

 

DEADHORSE SCAVENGER (2016) 
Deadhorse Bay is an area on the outskirts of Brooklyn, New York. This area has gone through many transformations. This location was once used to manufacture fertilizer from the remains of animal bodies and a site where tons of garbage had been dumped to create a landfill. The Bay’s core is where the horse bones were ground. A man made trail leading to the shore is where I have started my scavenging using the help of a metal detector. I dig and search for the metal artifacts left behind years ago. By documenting the void and artifacts this exposes the detritus left behind by the many industries. I capture each dig after unearthing the hidden artifacts in its state of deterioration. This has helped me understand the behavior towards the environment and the relationship between waste and landscape.